stress-driven

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Category: Blog posts (page 2 of 3)

Fracturing of ancient bedrock surfaces during an extremely hot summer

Long periods of exceptionally high temperatures in California and Finland this summer have been associated with the formation of large ‘exfoliation’ or ‘sheeting’ fractures in bedrock surfaces that may have remained largely unchanged since the last ice age.

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Randa rockfall update: One of those rare cases

In the case of the 29/08/14 failure, members of the ETH Zurich had captured images of the rock slope two weeks prior to the event, and as the SLF was working in the region at the time, images immediately (approx. 30 min) after the event are also available. This is a rare case for such a large alpine rockfall, and in addition to the video I posted earlier could offer opportunities to investigate the driving mechanism and failure process with more detail than is usually possible.

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Ongoing instability of the Randa rock slope (Switzerland)

A large Alpine rockfall caught on video

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Glacier retreat and slope instability, an example from Mount Kazbek, Georgia

A large landslide close to the Georgia – Russia border this week killed up to eight people, and disrupted construction of a new hydropower diversion tunnel.

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The Badakshan landslide: A forseeable tragedy?

A recent rainfall-triggered landslide in Ab Barek (sometimes referred to as Abe Bareek) in the Badakhshan Province of Afghanistan is suspected of taking the lives of up to 2100 villagers. As with so many remote events, details are scarce, although a number of images and videos have appeared on social media websites over the last […]

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Predicted distribution of various types of fracture beneath an Alpine valley. Here we start with a ‘V’ shaped topography, introduce ice, and manually cut out the center of the valley. Fractures forming in tension and shear are coloured yellow and orange, respectively, while active ‘micro-cracking’ is purple, and regions in which we predict explosive fracturing are marked in red under the ice. Note how the area of explosive fracturing increases as we remove ice, and the difference in fracture distribution between model Stages 14 and 32, for which the only difference is the relief of stresses during the intermediate period of deglaciation (Leith et al. 2014).

Leith, K., Moore, J.R., Amann, F., Loew, S., 2014. Sub-glacial extensional fracture development and implications for Alpine valley evolution. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 62-81.

Cartoon contributions to modelling real world physics

Numerical modelling is an important tool for most natural hazard researchers. Excellent codes now allow scientists and engineering practitioners the opportunity to simulate natural processes in both static and dynamic states.

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Environmental stress control on rock slope stability

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Location and volume of the La Pintada landslide

Heavy rainfall from hurricane Manuel initiated a large landslide which struck the village of La Pintada (Mexico) this Monday. 58 people have been reported missing in the small village, and at least 20 buildings have been destroyed. Although helicopters have rescued most of the villagers, 45 people remain, and authorities are concerned that “The rest […]

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Three simple ways to embed maps in a website or blog

Last week a major debris flow struck the town of Kedarnath, an important Hindu pilgrimage destination in the Uttarakhand region of northern India. One week on, details of the event are ever so slowly beginning to emerge, although the remoteness of Kedarnath, ongoing flooding within the region, and significant damage to infrastructure throughout Uttarakhand, means […]

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